Monday, July 20, 2009

Math problem of the week: 3rd Grade Everyday Math vs. Singapore Math

***Various delays have shifted OILF's problem of the week to Monday!***

1. One of the first dollars and cents problem in 3rd grade Everyday Math, Student Math Journal Volume 2
(p. 244):

1. Enter $3.58 into your calculator. The display shows ________

2. Enter the following amounts into your calculator.
Record what the display shows.
Don't forget to clear between each entry.

Price Display
$2.75 _____
$1.69 _____
$12.32 _____

Make up prices that are more than $1.00
_____ _____
_____ _____
_____ _____

3. Enter 68 cents into your calculator. The display shows _____

4. Enter the following amounts into your calculator.
Record what you see in the display.

Price Display
$0.10 _____
$0.26 _____
$0.09 _____

Make up prices that are less than $1.00.
_____ _____
_____ _____
_____ _____

5. Use your calculator to add $1.55 and $0.25

What does the display show? ____

Explain what happened. ___________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________

2. From the first dollars and cents problem set in 3rd grade Singapore Math, Primary Mathematics Workbook, 3B (p. 68):

Write each amount of money in figures:

(a) five dollars and sixty-five cents
(b) ten dollars and eight cents
...
(e) three hundred twenty dollars and four cents
(f) one thousand thirty dollars

Write each amount of money in figures:

(a) $0.80
(b) $1. 36
...
(g) $44.55
..
(i) $37.05

3. Extra Credit

a. Which involves more math: translation between numbers and calculator displays, or translation between numbers and words?

b. Does the age of calculators revise these priorities?

2 comments:

Mrs. C said...

We did stuff like this in our Everyday Math for a while and I about drove myself crazy trying to teach a 7 and 8 year old how to add, subtract, multiply and divide decimals because those are the implied skills with these sheets.

Here it is a year later and we are still working on those skills. :] One thing I notice with the EM stuff is that it "previews" a skill before the child is really ready to do the math. I find that a bit confusing.

PS Why are you no longer "lefty?" Have you changed your political opinions? LOL

Anonymous said...

Everyday math is horrid. We switched to a better school district but they still use everyday math from McGraw Hill. I cannot understand what long term benefit this series has other than being easy for teachers.

Its the 7th day of school for our 3rd grader and there is already an issue with the EM question. they are asking about a topic that ultimately involved division but he hasn't learned that yet. In addition, the answer they give is wrong. Are we supposed to just let him answer incorrectly such that they eventually get it right later on in the EM curriculum?

There is just one problem, what if they change to a different program? Or we move overseas? Ut oh - McGraw Hill better start lobbying the UN....