Thursday, July 15, 2010

Math problems of the week: 6th grade traditional math vs. Everyday Math

Two ways to sum up a chapter on fractions, decimals, and percents:

1. "Problems without Numbers," from Chapter I of Hamilton's Essentials of Arithmetic: Second Book (intended for students in the "sixth, seventh and eighth years"), p. 79



2. "Time to Reflect," from Unit 4 of the 6th grade Everyday Mathematics Student Math Journal Volume I, p. 161.

4 comments:

LexAequitas said...

"would you like to learn one method that works all the time or several methods that work all the time?"

What polemicizing. It's revolting.

Obviously they're trying to poke at a "right" answer. These kinds of questions annoyed me so much as a kid that I'd find reasons to support the "wrong" answer.

Anonymous said...

"would you like to learn one method that works all the time or several methods that work all the time?"

This would be a good place to answer that I would rather learn a single, traditional algorithm because I am less likely to become confused mid-stream AND should I become confused, a traditional algorithm has the advantage that my grandmother can help explain it without having to search the internet for examples.

Barry Garelick said...

My response to their question would be: "I could tell you, but it would be much better if you discover the answer yourself."

Mrs. C said...

It should be worded, "How WELL do you think you do..."

Arg. I would answer that I am awesome so I can have an A. It looks like it's training for the real world with this corny "self-report." You don't want the boss to use your weaknesses against you when it comes time to fire somebody. :)