Saturday, December 31, 2011

Anonymous, Amanda, and Deidre Mundy on Autism and visual thinking

(http://oilf.blogspot.com/2011/10/does-autism-really-mean-visual-thinking.html)


Anonymous said...

This is a very astute observation. People on the autistic spectrum do need extra prompts to capture and focus their attention (as do ADHD and ADD people). Providing a visual prompt that they can access constantly or repeatedly and on their own is a great help, and would explain why nonverbal children with autism are rarely taught sign language, which is visual but evanescent.


Amanda said...

Another hypothesis: good diagrams and other visuals can make underlying structure and linkages much clearer than a page of text or a teacher explanation on their own: maybe what seems to work with autistic children would actually be good for all children.

Deirdre Mundy said...

With respect to lists, organization methods, visual schedules, etc---

In my experience, the difference isn't that these things DON'T help normal people as well--it's that the ADHD kids need more overt instruction, practice and time with the organizational tools that seem to be second nature to the "normal" kids. The same goes for phonics, I think-- the kids I've seen who are "natural readers" also use phonics, they just picked them up without overt instruction.....

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