Wednesday, January 4, 2012

AmyP, FedUpMom, kcab and Anonymous on More front page accolades for hands-on classrooms

(http://oilf.blogspot.com/2011/12/more-front-page-accolades-hands-on.html)


Amy P said...

Is there some sort of pre-written template available to the journalists who turn out these pieces? Ugh.
FedUpMom said...

Something tells me that newspapers don't put their ace reporters on the education desk. I think this reporter is lazy more than anything else, and just repeating tired old phrases he's heard somewhere before. "No more desks in rows?" That might have been news in 1960.

Katharine Beals said...

Interestingly, the notion that students still mostly sit in rows is perpetuated by contemporary shows like South Park. Of course, it's easier to film (or depict) a class of kids if they're all sitting forward, but what makes things convenient for cinematographers and animators also contributes to the distorted views of classrooms by people in general and (sloppy) ed journalists in particular.

kcab said...

Just to offer a different view, maybe the tendency for desks to be arranged in rows varies a lot? I can't recall very many of my kids' elementary school classrooms having desks arranged in rows, but middle and high school have tended toward straightforward rows. Some classes never are (science, music) but most seem to be.

Anonymous said...

My sister is a teacher and she is really opposed to kids sitting around tables. Her son has Aspergers and she said it makes focusing even harder for him. She says that kids by nature are easily distracted and that the last thing you want to do is arrange desks in a way that makes it too easy for kids to focus on anything other than the teacher.
From what she has said, desks arranged in rows are pretty rare in the schools she has taught in. Her daughter attends a charter school and they do have rows. Her son attends a public school and they don't use rows.
My daughter takes homeschool classes through a charter school. They have rows in some classes but large tables in others. It would be interesting to see some statistics on rows versus other arrangement.

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