Sunday, November 4, 2012

Autism Diaries XL: Text-to-Self connections

Speaking of writing from a prompt about Of Mice and Men, here’s something J produced a few weeks ago in English class.

George feels mad about his siblings in charge. He lives in the house with the family. His house has 0 ceiling fans. He does something, eats food, goes to school, grows up, and rides a car. I am the only child and I live with my parents. My hose is small, 0 ceiling fans, no internet, and only 1 big gedroom, The kitchen is tiny, 1 burner, small oven, and a tiny refrigerator. I want to get a ceiling fan but my parents have no money. I also want a wii. There are no stores in my town and there is only 1 blackberry plant in my backyard. My grandparents send me food sometimes.
What you see here is J’s minimal understanding (and misunderstanding) of the story, followed by his version of a “text-to-self” (personal) connection: a series of lies about his home life. If he’d been asked to start a sentence beginning “Although George,” who knows what he’d come up with.

On the other hand, if he’d been asked write a sentence about hydrogen and oxygen that began with although, he’d have demonstrated full mastery of the meaning and usage this not particularly esoteric element of the English language.

4 comments:

Happy Elf Mom said...

I LOVE THIS. He should get an A. Text to self, right? He has fulfilled the mission.

Deirdre Mundy said...

But he does have siblings, doesn't he? And more than one bedroom....

Has your son taken to writing... fiction?

Nancy Bea Miller said...

My favorite line: There are no stores in my town and there is only 1 blackberry plant in my backyard.

I wasn't really feeling his pain till he told us about the dearth of blackberry plants in his yard. DEPRIVATION!

Yeah, as Dierdre Mundy said, are these lies or fiction? And what's the difference? (And get that boy another blackberry plant!) ;-)

FedUpMom said...

I liked this part:

***
He does something, eats food, goes to school, grows up, and rides a car.
***

This describes all of us, really. It's the modern existential crisis!