Monday, January 13, 2014

Monday pop quiz!



(h/t MuldersWorld.com)

1. Guess the diagnosis of the boy who completed this assignment.

2. What grade do you think he should get on it?

3. What grade do you think a neurotypical teacher might give him?

6 comments:

Deirdre Mundy said...

1. Class clown

2. 0 with option to redo, since the scrambled words aren't in alphabetical order by any rubric.

3. A C, because it's illegal to fail kids now.

Basically, who can make a diagnosis based on a single piece of paper?

Deirdre Mundy said...

Facepalm. I looked again and saw the pattern.

Still going with my diagnosis from #1 unless I see more work, though.

This is totally something my brothers would have done just to jerk the teacher around.

Auntie Ann said...

Too bad that it looks like a photoshop job. The "apple" is definitely be already crossed off before the students get the worksheet. I assume, the word was on line 1 as an example, and was erased in photoshop.

I'd give a kid a 100% for that one, if I were the teacher. The student obviously strongly understands alphabetic order.

Niels Henrik Abel said...

Looks familiar - this was the type of thing my kids did a time or two when they were younger, because they didn't fully comprehend the task. When I realized what they were thinking, I made sure to explain to them the difference between "putting words in alphabetical order" and "putting letters in alphabetical order" ~

gasstationwithoutpumps said...

1. gifted
2. A
3. F

lgm said...

LOL.

Teachers cannot diagnose. In the included classroom, these type of assignments are fully explained with examples before the paper is given to the student. Student would be prioritized for screening for vision and hearing. ADD/ADHD might be investigated if there are other areas that he shows inattention in besides those which he has mastered.

If student is unable to understand the difference between alphabetizing a set of words and individual letters within each word and has other similar issues, he'd be referred to the psych for cognitive testing.

I doubt the student is gifted, if this is real. Gifted students at this age typically grasp that this is a 'how to use the dictionary' type of lesson for their included classmates and inject other humor onto their paper to go along with planned silliness.