Monday, March 2, 2015

Why is innovation always the answer?, II

An article in the Philadelphia Inquirer has just announced that

Three Philadelphia School District leaders... will be meeting with Education Secretary Arne Duncan and other top principals from around the country in Washington.
The occasion? A program called "Principals at ED," which
"brings groups of highly innovative and successful principals from across the country to the Education Department to learn more about federal programs and to share experiences from their jobs as school leaders."
Guess which three principals have been chosen?

The principal of the school that has consistently scored first place citywide in the Pennsylvania School Performance Profile, based on test scores, attendance, AP and SAT scores, and teacher impact.

The principal of the school that currently scores first place, and has long scored second place, in the Pennsylvania School Performance Profile.

The principal of the school which, after years of obscurity, currently scores second place in the Pennsylvania School Performance Profile.

Or:

The principal of a school whose students score poorly on AP tests but which is a project-based, technology-empowered school that has "received national attention and prizes for [its] innovation."

The principal of school that has only been operating for two years but is a satellite of the project-based, technology-empowered, national attention and prize-winning school.

The principal of another school that has only been operating for two years but is a project-based, real-life-application school that has "received national attention and prizes for [its] innovation."

Hint: the article quotes one of the chosen principals as saying that "school should really be about problem solving, communicating, persistence, self-awareness, and project management."

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

"problem solving, communicating, persistence, self-awareness, and project management."

One would hope that school would not extinguish these skills in students, but children and teens really learn far more of them in their home and community lives. What, after all, is an hour spent helping to clean a house with ones' family?

Barry Garelick said...

I'll go out on a limb here and say the second set of schools.