Monday, December 21, 2015

Favorite comments of '15: Auntie Ann, Niels Henrik Abel, lgm, Crimson Wife, and Barry Garelick

On Math problems of the week: Common Core-inspired tessalations problems for grades 3-5:



Auntie Ann said...
Our kids did tessellations in about 4th grade...IN ART CLASS!
Niels Henrik Abel said...
I really don't understand the fascination with tessellations. Has manipulations with tessellations become a 21st century job skill?
Auntie Ann said...
It's helpful when working your post Masters-degree job at a sub shop to know how to tessellate triangular cheese slices.
Auntie Ann said...
Subway Finally Agrees to Tessellate Cheese:

http://gawker.com/5551263/subway-finally-agrees-to-tessellate-cheese
lgm said...
ime This is a typical full inclusion activity. Bring the pattern blocks up from kindy, but call it tessalation to disguise that reg ed has already figured out tiling. 
Crimson Wife said...
Singapore Primary Math includes tessellations so while I can't speak to what other countries are doing, the kids in high-scoring Singapore have been doing those kinds of problems for decades. 
Barry Garelick said...
I had tessellations in my math book in 7th and 8th grades (in the 60's) but it was devoted to one page and emphasized that in a tesselation, the sum of the angles at a particular point is 360 degrees. Thus, certain shapes like squares and hexagons tesselate while octagons do not. Octagons and squares can be made to tessellate, however. This is probably the emphasis in Singapore's program,though I haven't seen it.

What others are talking about here are the tessellations that involve the nesting/interlocking of designs. Mathematics takes a back seat to the art aspect of the activity.

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