Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Favorite comments of '15: Niels Henrik Abel, Auntie Ann, Barry Garelick, Unknown, and Anonymous

On Why is the answer always innovation?

Niels Henrik Abel said...
No. Just no. Keep the ed school dunderheads away from the other college instructors. It's bad enough that I get dinged on my observations for stupid stuff like failing to use the right buzzwords in my lectures and not phrasing section objectives in ways that can be "measurable" - never mind I get the objectives verbatim from the textbook itself, and if it's good enough for the textbook author and publisher, I don't see how my dean can have any grounds for objection.

Why don't the ed school people just go back to playing school with their stuffed animals like they no doubt did as kids, and leave the rest of us alone?
Auntie Ann said...
Because using the same books you have in storage doesn't keep the money flowing. If you can show that you can get the job done using the same old thing, then your budget will stagnate or shrink. Because every conference teachers and administrators go to is filled with vendors with shiny booths and flashy demonstrations selling snake-oil to the same people who bought last year's snake oil. 
Barry Garelick said...
What Auntie Ann said. Prime example: Much ado is being made over "formative assessments" with seminars on how to do it, books on the subject, etc. Good teachers have been doing this for years: checking for students understanding and adjusting accordingly. It's called "teaching".
Unknown said...
Many years ago, I remember reading an old Columbia adage that the widest street in the world is the one separating Teachers' College from the rest of the campus. Everyone I know says that the ed school at their colleges was an academic wasteland and had the worst teachers.
Anonymous said...
@Unknown
"Many years ago, I remember reading an old Columbia adage that the widest street in the world is the one separating Teachers' College from the rest of the campus."

As someone who picked up some extra money in college by tutoring, I can say that "education" majors were the dumbest and least-teachable tutoring subjects. And many of these were not just wannabe-teachers, but actual teachers back for additional courses. 

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