Saturday, December 31, 2016

Favorite comments of '16: Niels Henrik Abel and Anonymouses

On Going on automatic: should word processing supplant penmanship?

Niels Henrik Abel said...
I admit that I am firmly in the handwriting camp. To me it seems much easier to write with pen/pencil and paper than to stare at a blinking cursor, suffering from writer's block. I don't know whether this is a result of the generation in which I was raised, or if it's due to any actual neurological/psychological difference between writing longhand and pecking away at the keyboard. For what it's worth, I am a pretty decent typist, despite having learned late in life (after graduate school), but I suspect that's largely due to my skills as a piano player. Nonetheless, I much prefer writing a rough draft on paper and then typing it using a word processing program, even though some may view the handwritten rough draft as a "waste of time." The way I view it, however, is that it's not as much a waste of time as it would be if I just sat staring at a blank computer screen.
Anonymous said...
I read this article and it made me want to gag. I have seen so much horrific writing because the subject has been completely removed from the curriculum. Whatever is taught now the students only write in print. Nothing riles me more than seeing 12 year olds printing.

Bookish Babe
Anonymous said...
It's true that students do need to know how to type, and at an earlier age. But that doesn't mean they don't need to know how to write in cursive, for the reasons you indicate. But it's strange to me that so many think that keyboarding should actually replace handwriting. We did not propose to eliminate Algebra from secondary school curriculums when we introduced basic Computer Science; we made room for both.
Anonymous said...
5 second google search came up with these articles:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/memory-medic/201303/why-writing-hand-could-make-you-smarter
http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748704631504575531932754922518
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/03/science/whats-lost-as-handwriting-fades.html?_r=0

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